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Astronomical Calendar – September 2020

  • Sep 17 – New Moon, Comet 88P/Howell reaches its maximum brightness
  • Sep 18 – The Moon at perigee
  • Sep 19 – Conjunction of the Moon and Mercury, Mercury at aphelion, The Moon at perihelion
  • Sep 22 – The Autumn Equinox
  • Sep 24 – Moon at First Quarter
  • Sep 25 – Conjunction of the Moon and Jupiter
  • Sep 26 – Conjunction of the Moon and Saturn
  • Sep 27 – Daytime Sextantid meteor shower
  • Sep 28 – Mercury reaches the highest point in the evening sky
  • Sep 29 – The Moon at aphelion, 136472 Makemake at solar conjunction

What’s in the night sky for September 2020?

The new Moon: (Thu, 17 Sep 2020)

The new moon is the first lunar face. The Moon and Sun have the same ecliptic longitude that is the Moon will pass close to the Sun. In other words, the Earth, Moon, and Sun all lie in a roughly straight line, with the Moon in the middle. The positions of the Sun and Moon will be in the constellation Virgo.

Comet 88P/Howell reaches its maximum brightness: (Thu, 17 Sep 2020)

Comet 88P/Howell is back after 5.5 years. It was discovered on 29 August 1981. It is expected to reach its maximum brightness on September 17. It will be at a distance of about 1.37 AU from the Earth. you’ll not be able to see it with the naked eye because it is expected to reach its peak magnitude of 8.

The moon at perigee: (Fri, 18 Sep 2020)

On September 18 moon will be in its closest distance and seems to be bigger than its usual appearance. It can be visible in the constellation Virgo.

The conjunction of the Moon and Mercury: (Sat, 19 Sep 2020)

Both moon and mercury come closer which means they share the same right ascension. We can see them in the constellation Virgo. You can use your telescope or a pair of binoculars.

Mercury at aphelion: (Sat, 19 Sep 2020)

On September 19 Mercury will be in its farthest distance from Sun. It can be visible in the constellation Virgo.

The moon at perihelion: (Sat, 19 Sep 2020)

On September 19 moon will be in its closest distance from Sun. It can be visible in the constellation Virgo.

The Autumn Equinox: (Tue, 22 Sep 2020)

September 22 marks the first day of autumn in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring in the Southern Hemisphere. On this day, sunlight falls directly over the equator and every part of the world experiences 12 hours of day and night. The Sun can be spotted in Virgo on the day of the equinox.

The Moon at First Quarter: (Thu, 24 Sep 2020)

It appears almost exactly half illuminated on September 24. The Moon will be more prominent in the evening sky, setting around midnight. It can be seen in the constellation of Sagittarius.

The conjunction of the Moon and Jupiter: (Fri, 25 Sep 2020)

Both moon and Jupiter come closer which means they share the same right ascension. We can see them in the constellation of Sagittarius. You can use your telescope or a pair of binoculars.

The conjunction of the Moon and Saturn: (Sat, 26 SEP 2020)

Both moon and Saturn come closer which means they share the same right ascension. We can see them in the constellation of Sagittarius. You can use your telescope or a pair of binoculars.

The Daytime Sextantid meteor shower: (Sun, 27 Sep 2020)

The Daytime Sextantid meteor shower takes place within the constellation of Sextans. It occurs between 9 Sep- 9 Oct with the peak occurring on the 27Sep.

Mercury reaches the highest point in the evening sky: (Mon, 28 Sep 2020)

Mercury can be spotted in the sky at dusk. The position of Mercury when it reaches its highest point will be in the constellation Virgo.

The moon at aphelion: (Tue, 29 Sep 2020)

On September 29 moon will be in its farthest distance from Sun. the moon can be visible in the constellation Aquarius.

The 136472 Makemake at solar conjunction: (Tue, 29 Sep 2020)

On September 29 moon will be very close to the Sun and the moon will be unobservable for several weeks while it is lost in the Sun’s glare. It can be visible in the constellation of Coma Berenices.

Author

Anjaly Thomas

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  1. Nice

  2. There were very good information I liked it

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